A new permanent exhibition will open in June 2017. It focuses on the servants who cared for the count’s family during the 19th century. As a result of extensive renovation, the employees' bedrooms will be publicly accessible for the first time.

The new exhibition focuses on the servants who cared for the count’s family during the 19th century. As a result of extensive renovation, the employees' bedrooms will be publicly accessible for the first time.
Visitors will relive situations that have played out behind closed doors and in the corridors of the servant’s quarters.

The needs of the nobility must be fulfilled around the clock, and the arrival of the count, watched by the public, triggers more hustle and bustle among the staff. Domestic workers in white, spotless aprons stand motionless alongside the chambermaids. What do they dream of while sleeping at night in their rooms? What do they long for? The maids can be overheard while hanging up their washing. It’s interesting what they know about their gracious lords and ladies.

This insight into the servant’s world is enhanced by general information providing a broader context for the circumstances of domestic workers around 1900.